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å

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The Universal Character Set
Unicode name LATIN SMALL LETTER A WITH RING ABOVE
Latin-1 Supplement U+00E5

Contents

å lower case (upper case Å)

  1. The letter a with a ring above, considered an individual letter by most languages where it is used.


å (lower case å)

  1. The last letter of the Danish alphabet.

From Old Norse á (ow!).

å

  1. oh
  2. O
  3. well

From Old Norse á (river), from Proto-Germanic *ahwō, from Proto-Indo-European *akʷā- (water).

å c. (singular definite åen, plural indefinite åer)

  1. A small river; a creek; a big stream

Å, å

  1. The third to last letter of the Finnish alphabet.

Formed by conjoining an "A" and an "a", with the lower case letter on top of the capital letter. The letter was invented in Germany during the late Middle Ages and was first introduced to Swedish in the 1500's. From there it spread to Norway and Denmark, but it was first declared an official letter in the Norwegian alphabet in 1917.

Å, å

  1. The last letter of the Norwegian alphabet.

Before the letter's introduction in 1917, the sound it represents today (similar to the "a" in "all") was written with two A's, Aa (this spelling can still be seen in some proper names, and in digital media, such as urls or e-mails, due using a keyboard where the letter doesn't exist or for fear of mojibake). The two A's was originally a new form of the Old Norse á, whose representation was a long open a-sound (similar to the "a" in "father"). Gradually it turned into the modern å-sound and the Aa was eventually replaced with Å.

From Old Norse at, a preposition which originally meant "by" or "to". Related to Old Norse þat ("that") and English that. Also the origin of the Norwegian at and ad

å

  1. to (infinitive marker)
    Å løpe
    to run

From Old Norse ó, was used in the same sense.

å

  1. To express different emotions, oh
    Å, er det deg?
    oh, is it you?
    Å gud, for et dårlig vær det er
    oh dear, look how bad the weather is
    Å, skitt, du har problemer!
    oh shit, you're in trouble!
  2. Used to make the message more urgent, pleading, or to underline it, oh
    Å, vær så snill, kan vi ikke dra?
    oh, please, can't we go?
  3. To express hesitation or dismissal, oh
    Å ja, sier du det?
    oh really, is that so?
    Hva skjedde?. Å, ingenting
    what happened here?. Oh, nothing.
    Å, jeg er ikke så sikker på det
    oh, I'm not so sure about that

From Old Norse á, related to Latin aqua ("water").

å m. or f. (definite singular åa/åen; indefinite plural åer; definite plural åene)

  1. A small river; a creek; a big stream (used mostly in dialects, obsolete in writing)
    Mange bekker små gjør en stor å
    every little helps (literally: "Many small creeks makes a big stream")


Formed by conjoining an "A" and an "a", with the lower case letter on top of the capital letter. The letter was invented in Germany during the late Middle Ages and was first introduced to Swedish in the 1500's. From there it spread to Norway and Denmark, but it was first declared an official letter in the Norwegian alphabet in 1917.

Å, å

  1. The last letter of the Norwegian alphabet.

Before the letter's introduction in 1917, the sound it represents today (similar to the "a" in "all") was written with two A's, Aa (this spelling can still be seen in some cases). The two A's was originally a new form of the Old Norse á, whose representation was a long open a-sound (similar to the "a" in "father"). Gradually it turned into the modern å-sound and the Aa was eventually replaced with Å.

From Old Norse at, a preposition which originally meant "by" or "to". Related to Old Norse þat ("that") and English that. Also the origin of the Norwegian at and ad

å

  1. to (infinitive marker)
    Å løpe
    To run

From Old Norse preposition á, "on, on top of".

å

  1. used in certain fixed expressions regarding position
    Han fall å bak.
    He fell backwards. (literally: "he fell on back.")
    Ho låg å gruve.
    She was laying on her stomach.
  2. used in expressions regarding time
    Det er midt å natta.
    It's the middle of the night.

From Old Norse ó, was used in the same sense.

å

  1. To express different emotions, oh
    Å, er det deg?
    oh, is it you?
    Å gud, for eit dårlig vêr det er
    oh dear, look how bad the weather is
    Å, skitt, du er i trøbbel!
    oh shit, you're in trouble!
  2. Used to make the message more urgent, pleading, or to underline it, oh
    Å, ver så snill, kan vi ikkje dra?
    oh, please, can't we go?
  3. To express hesitation or dismissal, oh
    Å ja, seier du det?
    oh really, is that so?
    Hva skjedde?. Å, ingenting
    what happened here?. Oh, nothing.
    Å, eg er ikkje så sikker på det
    oh, I'm not so sure about that

From Old Norse á, related to Latin aqua ("water").

å f. (definite singular åa, indefinite plural åer, definite plural åene)

  1. A small river; a creek; a big stream (used mostly in dialects, obsolete in writing)
    Mange bekker små gjer ei stor å
    numerous small contributions give big results (literally: "Many small creeks makes a big stream")


Å, å IPA:

  1. The third to last letter of the Swedish alphabet, pronunced /oː/ when long, and /ɔ/ when short.

IPA:

  1. A small river; a creek; a big stream
    Gå inte över ån efter vatten
    Don’t cross the stream to get water

å

  1. (obsolete except in certain expressions) obsolete variant of

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